Browse Prior Art Database

Panel Holder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087314D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fellows, CJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The development of large printed-circuit panels, which consist of multi-layers of large, thin subassemblies laminated together, has resulted in the need for new equipment to facilitate the necessary processing of the panels in the various chemical solutions used. One requirement is to have a frame to hold the panels under tension during the processing steps and to accomplish this with the least additional material being presented to the chemical baths, other than the processed panel itself.

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Panel Holder

The development of large printed-circuit panels, which consist of multi-layers of large, thin subassemblies laminated together, has resulted in the need for new equipment to facilitate the necessary processing of the panels in the various chemical solutions used. One requirement is to have a frame to hold the panels under tension during the processing steps and to accomplish this with the least additional material being presented to the chemical baths, other than the processed panel itself.

Such a panel holder (Fig. 1) consists of a rectangular rod assembly 11 which is made of spring-type material. At each corner of the frame 11 is affixed a protrusion 13 having a support pin 15 riveted thereto. The panel 17 is supported in the frame 11 by the pins 15 inserted through holes 19 in the corners of the panel 17. This is more clearly seen in Fig. 1A.

In order to properly mount the panel 17 in the holder 11 under a proper stress, a loading fixture 21 (Fig. 2) is used. The spring frame 11 is constrained at its corners by suitable pins 23 mounted to the loading fixture. Then, air cylinders are activated to spread the sides of the frame 11 outwardly, as indicated in Fig. 1, which outward motion of the sides causes the corners to move radially inward. This provides spring tensioning in the sides which is transmitted to the corners of the panel so that when the air cylinders 25 are deactivated, the panel 17 is properly stressed on the frame 11.

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