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Laser Sensing Apparatus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087321D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kern, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Monitoring industrial waste water systems by laser sensing is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 19, No. 1, June 1976, pp. 45-46.

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Laser Sensing Apparatus

Monitoring industrial waste water systems by laser sensing is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 19, No. 1, June 1976, pp. 45-46.

System 10 is housed in a sealed unit 11, shown in cross-section, which has a transparent window 12. A flotation collar 13 is affixed to unit 11. A chain 14 and power driven spool 15 lower and raise unit 11 onto the surface T of the waste water W contained in monitor tank or container C.

System 10 includes a monochromatic laser L, rotatable mirror M associated with a shaft encoder (not shown), lens system 16 and a bicell detector 17. Initially, mirror M is stationary and the image of the laser beam spot from mirror M is reflected from the waste water and falls on one cell or the other of detector 17 depending on the angular setting of mirror M. The output signal of the particular cell generates a command start signal which in turn drives the mirror motor, (not shown), so that the laser beam spot scans detector 17 in a direction toward the other cell. When the spot appears equally between the two cells, each cell senses a balanced light input condition which is decoded as a stop signal for the mirror motor. The angular position of the mirror M in the resultant stopped position is a measure of the distance, i.e., height, of the chemical blanket surface S.

Within a given upper surface range T1-T2, chemical blanket surface S moves up or down between the range S1-S2. In response, the beam spot im...