Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Control with Timing Override

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087340D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carballo, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a Leeds and Northrup Electromax Slave Controller Model #6432 which is employed in controlling multizoned furnaces of the type described in U. S. Patent 3,842,794. Although circuitry for dynamic control is provided by utilization of a feedback approach, difficulty in activating the unit was encountered when connected in a SLAVE mode. By definition, a SLAVE controller only follows a specific temperature (e.g., plus or minus 100 Degrees C) from the master temperature conditions instead of dynamically performing as the temperature of each zone would require.

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Dynamic Control with Timing Override

Fig. 1 shows a Leeds and Northrup Electromax Slave Controller Model #6432 which is employed in controlling multizoned furnaces of the type described in U. S. Patent 3,842,794. Although circuitry for dynamic control is provided by utilization of a feedback approach, difficulty in activating the unit was encountered when connected in a SLAVE mode. By definition, a SLAVE controller only follows a specific temperature (e.g., plus or minus 100 Degrees C) from the master temperature conditions instead of dynamically performing as the temperature of each zone would require.

The problem in the use of the controller was resolved by use at circuit portion 10 of an added timing device network 10A or 10B (Figs. 2 and 3) for controlling the output of the controller during dynamic mode operation, allowing them to acquire full controlling capability for three-zone operation.

The timing network 1OA or 1OB is an integrated module connected as a single-shot multivibrator which is physically wired to the rest of the controller network. For network 10A, it is wired to the line between points A and B, whereas for network 10B, the line between points A and B is broken and the network connected thereacross, as shown.

The output of the network operates a single relay which is activated only when the timing device is ON. The relay controls the output of the control applying full power (e.g., relay 10A, Fig. 2) or nonpower output (e.g., relay 10B, Fig....