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Forming Green Ceramic Sheets on Thin Plastic Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087345D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brunner, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The present techniques for forming multilayer ceramic modules require the application of heat and pressure in a hot lamination process to produce composites of green sheet and thin polyester films. The green sheets are deformed due to plastic deformation of the resin. Distortions on the order of 2 to 3 mils are typical and are functionally questionable. Current techniques to form composites on a thin film have resulted in sheets with curling that render them unsuitable for processing.

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Forming Green Ceramic Sheets on Thin Plastic Films

The present techniques for forming multilayer ceramic modules require the application of heat and pressure in a hot lamination process to produce composites of green sheet and thin polyester films. The green sheets are deformed due to plastic deformation of the resin. Distortions on the order of 2 to 3 mils are typical and are functionally questionable. Current techniques to form composites on a thin film have resulted in sheets with curling that render them unsuitable for processing.

In this technique, a second film possessing qualities of mechanical stiffness and surface characteristics to induce wetting is provided as an underlay to the thin plastic film. The underlaid film is made larger to permit wetting by the ceramic slurry. Referring to Fig. 1, a ceramic slurry tin is dispensed on the top of a thin plastic film provided by roll 12 in turn supported by a heavier plastic film provided by roll 14. Film 12 is typically a one mil thick MYLAR* film while the heavier film 14 is typically three mil MYLAR film. The green ceramic slurry is shaped by a doctor blade 16 on the combination of films and subsequently dried.

As indicated in Fig. 2, the underlay carrier film 14 has a width greater than the thin film 12. The slurry in practice is allowed to bleed beyond the edges of the thin film 12 onto the carrier film 14. Due to surface tension, a small quantity of slurry will wet the underside of the top film 12. Upon d...