Browse Prior Art Database

Gas Display Panel Spacer Rod Grooves

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087369D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eames, WR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In the manufacture of gaseous discharge display panels, it is conventional practice to mate two glass plates by a perimeter-sealing process. The plates include confronting, orthogonally positioned, but spaced apart, conductive lines thereon forming grid matrices which when energized create spots at the intersections for forming characters. In order to accomplish the finished end product, the plates are sealed in spaced-apart relation one from the other a predetermined distance, and when filled with an argon-neon mixture, may be ignited to facilitate the gaseous discharge display.

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Gas Display Panel Spacer Rod Grooves

In the manufacture of gaseous discharge display panels, it is conventional practice to mate two glass plates by a perimeter-sealing process. The plates include confronting, orthogonally positioned, but spaced apart, conductive lines thereon forming grid matrices which when energized create spots at the intersections for forming characters. In order to accomplish the finished end product, the plates are sealed in spaced-apart relation one from the other a predetermined distance, and when filled with an argon-neon mixture, may be ignited to facilitate the gaseous discharge display.

It has been conventional practice to place seal rods adjacent the periphery of the glass of the front plate, and locate spacer rods within the periphery so that, when the process conditions have been met, the softer seal rods will melt, allowing the upper plate or back plate to collapse until it abuts the spacer rods. A problem has occurred with the spacer rod moving around within the cavity during the processing steps and occasionally shattering under temperature and/or pressure.

The problem has been alleviated, as illustrated in the figure, by grooving the dielectric glass overcoat in such a manner that the groove conforms as closely as possible to the shape of the spacer rod. In the present instance, i.e., in the case of the round spacer rod, a V-shaped groove, slightly smaller than the diameter of the rod, gives the best results. Such a shape has...