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Etching Conical Through Holes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087379D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brunsch, A: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This method is particularly useful for producing nozzles for ink jet printers. Conical through-holes produced according to this method have identical shapes and exit holes, irrespective of differences in the plate thickness or the etching rates resulting, for example, from the irregular structure of the plate.

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Etching Conical Through Holes

This method is particularly useful for producing nozzles for ink jet printers. Conical through-holes produced according to this method have identical shapes and exit holes, irrespective of differences in the plate thickness or the etching rates resulting, for example, from the irregular structure of the plate.

According to Fig. 1, photoresist mask 1 is applied to substrate 2. Through openings in mask 1 conical holes are etched by means of a liquid etchant, but the etching process is stopped before any of the holes have been etched through.

In Fig. 2 housings 3 and 4 are placed on the surfaces of substrate 2. The separation lines between housings 3 and 4 and substrate 2 are sealed by gaskets 5.

The chamber formed by housing 3 and substrate 2 is filled with argon. A high-frequency generator 6 is connected to electrode 7 and substrate 2. The high-frequency field in this chamber forces argon ions against substrate 2, causing sputter etching in the hole.

The lower chamber formed by housing 4 and substrate 2 is filled with a scavenging gas, e.g., a mixture of oxygen and argon or water. In the lower chamber the pressure of the Ar is slightly higher than the pressure of the Ar in the upper chamber, and the partial pressure of the O(2) or H(2)O is considerably higher than the pressure of the Ar in the upper chamber.

After a hole has been made through substrate 2, the gases in both chambers merge in the hole area, and the high O(2) or H(2)O pa...