Browse Prior Art Database

Multiplexed Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087412D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The optical scanning, decoding, and processing of a universal product code (UPC) symbol may be accomplished by a system consisting of a scanner, which produces an electrical representation of the marks on a package being scanned, a signal processor which interprets the mark representation and decodes them into UPC numbers, and a terminal which processes the number. The signal processor is further broken into sections to accomplish data development, symbol find, decode, qualification and data transfer to the terminal, as illustrated in Figure 1.

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Multiplexed Scanner

The optical scanning, decoding, and processing of a universal product code (UPC) symbol may be accomplished by a system consisting of a scanner, which produces an electrical representation of the marks on a package being scanned, a signal processor which interprets the mark representation and decodes them into UPC numbers, and a terminal which processes the number. The signal processor is further broken into sections to accomplish data development, symbol find, decode, qualification and data transfer to the terminal, as illustrated in Figure 1.

Element 1, data development logic, transforms the electrical representation of the symbol provided by the scanner into digital data words representing the width of the marks and spaces of the symbol or of the package on which the symbol appears.

Element 2, candidate select, accomplishes symbol find by storing data words until the logic determines that a candidate has been selected which will probably decode into the first or last half of a UPC symbol.

Element 3, the decode or recognition logic, determines the six digits represented by the data stored at the time this candidate was selected. The parity of the six digits is checked to verify that it is legitimate for the first half or second half of a full twelve character label, or for the entirety of a zero suppressed label. If legitimate, the six characters are stored in a temporary storage awaiting qualification.

The objective of the quality logic element 4 is to assure that, of the symbol candidates selected, the two half labels most probably representing the symbol on the package being scanned are the ones presented to the terminal for processing. This is accomplished by tabulating the number of occurrences of unique half symbols for each half of the symbol. The unique half symbol for the first half and the unique half symbol for the last half, occurring the most times during the pass of the package through the scanning area, are selected for processing by the terminal.

Element 5, the I/O control logic, provides interface for the signal processor to the terminal.

The attachmemt of more than one scanner to a terminal may be accomplished by duplicating the entire signal processor for each additional scanner. A hardware saving can be accomplished by time sharing some sections of the scanner signal processor logic among the additional scanners, as shown in Figure 2, for the case of two scanners.

The multiplexing of the scanner logic is shown to be feasible without serious system performance degradation by considering the characteristic of a scanner operation. The scan pattern of the laser beam is produced by a sinusoidal horizontal and vertical deflection of the beam...