Browse Prior Art Database

Adding Mark Sense Capability to Optical Character Recognition System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087431D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Plummer, WB: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is frequently desirable to enter variable data by hand on machine-printed forms or packages, for example, when taking inventory. This requires an optical character-recognition (OCR) system to read hand printing in addition to machine-printed characters. But small OCR systems such as hand-held wands generally do not provide hand-print capability. Bar-code and similar readers do not solve this problem because they require precisely spaced clocking marks. This capability may be effectively added at a relatively low cost to OCR machines such as that described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 18, No. 12, May 1976, pp. 4135-4136.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Adding Mark Sense Capability to Optical Character Recognition System

It is frequently desirable to enter variable data by hand on machine-printed forms or packages, for example, when taking inventory. This requires an optical character-recognition (OCR) system to read hand printing in addition to machine- printed characters. But small OCR systems such as hand-held wands generally do not provide hand-print capability. Bar-code and similar readers do not solve this problem because they require precisely spaced clocking marks. This capability may be effectively added at a relatively low cost to OCR machines such as that described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 18, No. 12, May 1976, pp. 4135-4136.

The above drawing shows a portion of a document (or package) 10 having a series 11 of machine-printed characters 0-9 and X. Each character s associated with two printed bubbles 12 and 13 and a contour 14 for indicating which bubbles are associated with which characters. Characters 11 are visible to the optical scanner, while lines 12-14 are printed with an ink which is visible to the eye, but not to the scanner.

The bubbles may then be hand-marked with a pencil or other medium visible to the scanner, as at 12' and 13', to indicate the quantity "23". That is, the upper row of bubbles 12 represents a "tens" digit, while the lower row 13 signifies a "units" digit. This information may be interpreted by the OCR system merely by adding recognition logics for two...