Browse Prior Art Database

Stacked Envelope Aligner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087456D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sokol, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

When envelopes of various widths are allowed to "free-fall" stack, even over a short distance, into a fixed-width stacker designed to accommodate the widest envelope, any envelope narrower than the widest envelope will tend to stack randomly. This produces a stack which is not only not acceptable in appearance, but also difficult to handle. One solution is to vary the stacker width for each type of envelope prior to stacking. This solution places a requirement on the operator to adjust the width and also tends to restrict the entry of the envelopes into the stacker.

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Stacked Envelope Aligner

When envelopes of various widths are allowed to "free-fall" stack, even over a short distance, into a fixed-width stacker designed to accommodate the widest envelope, any envelope narrower than the widest envelope will tend to stack randomly. This produces a stack which is not only not acceptable in appearance, but also difficult to handle. One solution is to vary the stacker width for each type of envelope prior to stacking. This solution places a requirement on the operator to adjust the width and also tends to restrict the entry of the envelopes into the stacker.

The illustrated mechanism serves the function of aligning various-width envelopes, but performs it automatically and without envelope entry restrictions. The patter 1 is a moveable arm which protrudes into the envelope stacker 2 with sufficient extension to align the narrowest envelope against the front of the stacker 3. It is pivotable on the pivot shaft 4 and can be retracted from the stacker. It is spring-biased by spring 5 so that its normal rest position is in the extended position protruding into the stacker.

When an envelope is fed into the stacker, the patter is pivoted via the solenoid 6 out of the stacker to allow unrestricted envelope entry into the stacker. After a time delay, which insures that the envelope has reached its rest position, the patter is allowed to swing back into the stacker. In doing so, it aligns the newly stacked envelope up against the front of...