Browse Prior Art Database

Applying Corrugated Dielectric to Gas Panel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087570D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eldridge, AJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In gaseous discharge displays/storage devices such as gas panels, one of the problems of particular concern in large panel assemblies relates to providing and maintaining a uniform gap across the entire inner surface of the panel. Various solutions to this problem have been proposed, generally relating to the use of rod spacers composed of either hard glass or metal. However, such spacers present problems both in fabrication and aesthetic appearance on the display surface. A method for fabricating a gas panel without a requirement for intermediate spacers operates as follows.

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Applying Corrugated Dielectric to Gas Panel

In gaseous discharge displays/storage devices such as gas panels, one of the problems of particular concern in large panel assemblies relates to providing and maintaining a uniform gap across the entire inner surface of the panel. Various solutions to this problem have been proposed, generally relating to the use of rod spacers composed of either hard glass or metal. However, such spacers present problems both in fabrication and aesthetic appearance on the display surface. A method for fabricating a gas panel without a requirement for intermediate spacers operates as follows.

Referring to Fig. 1, a glass plate 11 has metal conductors 13 formed thereon and a mixture of negative acting photoresist and dielectric glass frit 15 applied over the conductors by any conventional means. The photoresist and glass frit mixture 15 is exposed through the plate from a light source (not shown) below the plate so that the metal lines 13 will shield the areas where the dielectric and photoresist are to be removed. The plate is then developed, and the resist and dielectric mixture over the conductors etched, as shown in Fig. 2, leaving a thin layer of dielectric 17 over conductors 13. Control of the thickness of the dielectric over the conductors is provided by appropriate control of the development cycle.

The plate is then placed in an oven and the dielectric and photoresist mixture reflowed, whereby the substantially rectangular config...