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Cost Reduced Panel Drive System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087571D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Martin, WJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In driving gaseous discharge display devices, a number of voltage levels are utilized depending upon the function to be provided and to ensure that nonselective cells are not fired by the partial selection of the associated line. Typical operating voltages for a gaseous discharge device are shown in Figs. 1A, 1B and 1C. The voltage across the cell controls the function to be provided by the cell, and is a composite of the signals applied to the horizontal and vertical conductors.

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Cost Reduced Panel Drive System

In driving gaseous discharge display devices, a number of voltage levels are utilized depending upon the function to be provided and to ensure that nonselective cells are not fired by the partial selection of the associated line. Typical operating voltages for a gaseous discharge device are shown in Figs. 1A, 1B and 1C. The voltage across the cell controls the function to be provided by the cell, and is a composite of the signals applied to the horizontal and vertical conductors.

Typical values such as shown in Figs. 1A, 1B and 1C are 200 volts for full select, 180 volts for half-select and 160 volts for deselect using 20 volt selection signals for the horizontal and vertical axes. The composite waveforms for Figs. 1A and 1B are shown in Fig. 1C in which a deselect signal of 160 volts is followed by two half-select signals of 180 volts followed by a full select signal of 200 volts. Circuitry required to generate 20 volt signals is relatively costly as compared to signal generators having a 10 volt rating.

A method for generating signals identical to those shown in Fig. 1C, using 10 volt circuitry, operates as follows: In the horizontal axis, a +10 to +180 volt waveform is generated. Ten volt selection signals float on this waveform and add to or subtract from its amplitude at each level, as desired. This produces the waveforms at the horizontal selection outputs shown in Fig. 2A, the initial output having a +10 volt reference rathe...