Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Functional Test for Fiber Optics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087575D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Paterson, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Multifiber optics using a common detector suffer from the possibility that one of the fibers may not function correctly and the malfunction is not detected by operation of the detecting circuit. A low cost test apparatus can be used in conjunction with the multifiber optics to insure proper functioning of each light fiber.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 88% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Dynamic Functional Test for Fiber Optics

Multifiber optics using a common detector suffer from the possibility that one of the fibers may not function correctly and the malfunction is not detected by operation of the detecting circuit. A low cost test apparatus can be used in conjunction with the multifiber optics to insure proper functioning of each light fiber.

Referring to the figure, light fibers 11, 13 and 15 are routed to a common detector 17, while fibers 19 and 21 are routed to detector 23. Detectors 17 and 23 provide control signal outputs whenever there is no light incident upon them. Should any one of the fibers break or become contaminated with dirt, its corresponding detector could provide a false signal output resulting in machine malfunction.

In order to prevent such a malfunction, mask 25 is driven between the light source (not shown) and the input end of the optical fibers by stepper drive 27. The mask has apertures 29 therein that are arranged such that alternate fibers, one at a time, are illuminated while the light to the remaining fibers sensed by the common detector is simultaneously blocked. Each aperture area produces a corresponding pulse which is amplified by amplifiers 31 and 33, causing counters 35 and 37 to step.

If the count in each counter corresponds to the number of optical fibers of its associated detector, then all optical fibers are properly working. A signal from the amplifier, indicating that the mask no longer blocks the opt...