Browse Prior Art Database

Rotary Encoder Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087620D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, HW: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a rotary encoder-printer for magnetically encoding and/or printing magnetic striped labels, tags and documents under computer control, or, alternately, under operator control such as in a conventional output printer. The encoding head is driven by a stepping motor through an elastic flat belt, and is arranged to move circumferentially around an enlarged document platen, traveling about 150 degrees to encode, and performing a readback function on its return stroke.

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Rotary Encoder Printer

This is a rotary encoder-printer for magnetically encoding and/or printing magnetic striped labels, tags and documents under computer control, or, alternately, under operator control such as in a conventional output printer. The encoding head is driven by a stepping motor through an elastic flat belt, and is arranged to move circumferentially around an enlarged document platen, traveling about 150 degrees to encode, and performing a readback function on its return stroke.

Fig. 1 shows schematically the path of document 1 thru the device. Document 1 enters over guide surface 2 under friction lever 3, around platen 4, around the document tractor 5, and out over the exit guide 6.

In Fig. 1, magnetic encoding head 7 is shown in its standby location, as is the wire matrix print head 8. Encoder drive stepping motor 9 drives head 7 through drive belt 10. Platen 4 diameter is 3.82 inches to permit encoding on magnetic stripes up to 3.5 inches long, with document 1 contacting platen 4 for a 150- degree wrap.

Fig. 2 is a plan view showing details of the encode head 7 mounting. Head 7 is pivotally mounted in the head arm 11 so that the head will be uniformly loaded across its face. Head arm 11 is pivotally mounted in rotor 12, with head 7 spring- loaded into platen 4 by spring 13. Ball bearing 14 is mounted on head arm 11 to act against a cam (not shown) to cause head 7 to be lifted from magnetic stripe 15 when head 7 is in its standby position. A typical document, consisting of backing 16 with sprocket holes 16a, adhesive-backed labels 17, with magnetic stripe 15, is shown in position on platen 4.

Optical timing disk 18 has two timing tracks, which in conjunction with light emitting diode and photo-transistor assemblies (not shown) provide data clocking and head location information. Track one contains a window, which is in the 'open' condition when the head is in its standby position, and a clocking series of windows beginning when head 7 is in position over the leading edge of a 3.5 inch-long magnetic stripe, spaced at intervals equivalent to two recorded bits and terminating when head 7 is over the trailing edge of magnetic stripe 15. Track two has a window that is 'open' when head 7 is in its standby position, and closes in a predetermined position to initiate recording on a 3.5 inch-long stripe, and a window that is open when head 7 is at the end of its writing stroke and remains open thru to end of travel. To initiate writing on stripes shorter than 3.5 inches, clock pulses are counted beginning...