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Low Stress Chromium Film

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087656D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dempsey, JJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Chromium films deposited via evaporation in a vacuum chamber are known to be in a state of very high tensile stress up to about 20 x 10/9/ dynes/cm/2/. Since the chromium is brittle, these high tensile stresses cause the films to crack and, also, possibly to curl off the substrates. The subject technique for depositing chromium film employs an oxygen or air ambient during the film deposition to change the stress conditions from tensile to compressive, and thereby reduce cracking and pinholes.

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Low Stress Chromium Film

Chromium films deposited via evaporation in a vacuum chamber are known to be in a state of very high tensile stress up to about 20 x 10/9/ dynes/cm/2/. Since the chromium is brittle, these high tensile stresses cause the films to crack and, also, possibly to curl off the substrates. The subject technique for depositing chromium film employs an oxygen or air ambient during the film deposition to change the stress conditions from tensile to compressive, and thereby reduce cracking and pinholes.

Depending on the geometry of the vacuum chamber, the position of the O(2) source, the location of the Cr source, etc., the change from tensile to compressive stress occurs in an O(2) range of about 5 x 10/-6/ torr (during deposition). By proper selection of the O(2) level and the rate of evaporation of chromium, one can arrive at a state of zero stress. Increasing the O(2) pressure beyond this level will produce compressive stresses which, from the point of view of film cracking, are much more favorable than tensile stresses.

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