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DSDT Target Substrate Preparation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087707D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jozol, ET: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Raw or green mica substrates used in the fabrication of targets for deformographic storage display tubes (DSDT) often have minute surface defects which do not yield satisfactory targets. These defects minimize the surface quality of the mica substrate. As a result, when the deformable polymer layer is formed on the substrate surface and the layer is subsequently metallized, either as a transmissive-type target or, particularly, as a reflective-type target, the optical quality of the metal surface is adversely affected. Also, the nonuniform defects in the mica surface result in corresponding nonuniform deposition of the polymer layer on the mica surface. This results in a nonuniform thickness of the polymer layer which adversely affects the control of the deformations thereof.

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DSDT Target Substrate Preparation

Raw or green mica substrates used in the fabrication of targets for deformographic storage display tubes (DSDT) often have minute surface defects which do not yield satisfactory targets. These defects minimize the surface quality of the mica substrate. As a result, when the deformable polymer layer is formed on the substrate surface and the layer is subsequently metallized, either as a transmissive-type target or, particularly, as a reflective-type target, the optical quality of the metal surface is adversely affected. Also, the nonuniform defects in the mica surface result in corresponding nonuniform deposition of the polymer layer on the mica surface. This results in a nonuniform thickness of the polymer layer which adversely affects the control of the deformations thereof.

A preparation is proposed that significantly increases the target yield. Surface defects are mitigated by rubbing the raw mica surface with an industrial polishing cloth. The surface is polished using a lint-free polishing cloth or pad, e.g., an AB MICROCLOTH* pad, in a circular motion, at first, to generate a mica powder on the surface. The surface is then viewed in a bright light source from a shallow viewing angle. The defects appear as bright spots on the surface. These spots are then removed by abrading with, for example, the smooth end of a small wooden rod or the like.

Thereafter, a final abrasion of the mica surface is accomplished with a polishing c...