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Tailoring Mismatch of Composite Films by Ion Implantation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087718D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hu, SM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Intrinsic and/or thermal mismatch almost always occurs in various systems of composite films, or films on substrates, although the degree of mismatch varies. An example of mismatch is a silicon nitride surface film on a silicon substrate. The mismatch can be so strong as to cause cracking or warping of the wafers, or in the less severe case, the introduction of misfit dislocations in the substrate.

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Tailoring Mismatch of Composite Films by Ion Implantation

Intrinsic and/or thermal mismatch almost always occurs in various systems of composite films, or films on substrates, although the degree of mismatch varies. An example of mismatch is a silicon nitride surface film on a silicon substrate. The mismatch can be so strong as to cause cracking or warping of the wafers, or in the less severe case, the introduction of misfit dislocations in the substrate.

The intrinsic stress is inherently severe for silicon nitride films and many other surface films made by chemical vapor deposition methods. In the actual usage of Si(3)N(4) films for either surface passivation or diffusion or oxidation masking, it is common practice to mitigate the interfacial stress due to the nitride film by forming (usually by thermal oxidation) a thin intermediary SiO(2) film between the Si(3)N(4) film and the silicon substrate. But even in this type of composite Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2)/Si structure, the stress produced in the substrate can still be substantial, particularly around the edges of openings of such films. Such stresses can compound with thermal stresses during the subsequent high temperature processes, and consequently generate various crystallographic defects with possible undesirable leakage currents in devices built on such systems.

In this method, ion implantation is used for tailoring the mismatch between composite films with the objective of reducing the mismatch to or near zero,...