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Program Design Query System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087752D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Meyers, GJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

During the design of a software system, the designer often desires to obtain information about the design (e.g., what modules call module XYZ?). If the program being designed is large (e.g., consisting of hundreds or thousands of modules), this information may not be readily available without scanning the program's voluminous documentation. Also, if the designer has to resort to such a manual scanning process, he is likely to make mistakes by overlooking some information. The program design query system solves this problem by storing information about the program's design in a data base and allowing the designer to query this information from a terminal.

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Program Design Query System

During the design of a software system, the designer often desires to obtain information about the design (e.g., what modules call module XYZ?). If the program being designed is large (e.g., consisting of hundreds or thousands of modules), this information may not be readily available without scanning the program's voluminous documentation. Also, if the designer has to resort to such a manual scanning process, he is likely to make mistakes by overlooking some information. The program design query system solves this problem by storing information about the program's design in a data base and allowing the designer to query this information from a terminal.

The designer first interacts with the system to build a data base of design information about his program. The designer describes each module interface; a module interface description consists of the names of the calling and called modules and a definition of the input and output arguments. The designer is also prompted to describe the strength of each module and the coupling among the modules. (See G. J. Myers, Reliable Software Through Composite Design, New York: Petrocelli/Charter, 1975 for a definition of module strength and coupling.)

Once the data base has been constructed, the designer can use these three query commands: 1. If the designer wishes to locate all modules that call a given module, he enters the WHEREUSED command. The system searches the data base for all modules tha...