Browse Prior Art Database

Angled Ribbon Guide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087756D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Giallo, JF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for distributing the printing activity over the entire surface area of a ribbon or film in a printer in order to achieve benefits of increased ribbon life and decreased mechanical movement of the ribbon per print line.

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Angled Ribbon Guide

This article describes a technique for distributing the printing activity over the entire surface area of a ribbon or film in a printer in order to achieve benefits of increased ribbon life and decreased mechanical movement of the ribbon per print line.

In previous equipment the printing ribbon has been moved parallel to the printing line, using up one or two tracks on the ribbon surface equal to the height of the printed characters. In order to ensure a fresh ink supply for the next line of print, it has been necessary to move the ribbon laterally by an amount equal to the length of the print line or else experience degradation in printing quality or density as ink is used up. Fig. 1 illustrates a typical print ribbon having a width W and various print lines of height H and length L. A distance D is the length that must be moved each time the printer has completed one line of print in order to ensure a new ink supply for the next print line.

Fig. 2 illustrates an improved technique in which the ribbon is provided with guides (not shown) to move at an angle alpha to the print line. This results in effectively angling the track of a given print line across the ribbon from a point adjacent to the top edge of a ribbon to a point adjacent to the bottom edge. In order to ensure a fresh ink supply for the next line of print, it is only necessary to move the ribbon a horizontal distance great enough to cause a point on the ribbon surface to move vert...