Browse Prior Art Database

Movable Head Movable Track Accessing Arrangement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087785D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lissner, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A tape transport employs continuous or intermittent linear tape motion and limited oscillatory or reciprocating motion of a magnetic head (or heads), with direct coupling to read-write circuitry.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Movable Head Movable Track Accessing Arrangement

A tape transport employs continuous or intermittent linear tape motion and limited oscillatory or reciprocating motion of a magnetic head (or heads), with direct coupling to read-write circuitry.

Tape 1 (Fig. 1) is moved linearly (into the plane of this sheet) over read-write head(s) 2, operatively connected to and movable relative to the moving tape by actuator 3. Flexible connectors 4 can be used to convey signals from head 2 to conventional read-write circuitry (not shown). Motion of tape 1 is initialized and synchronized to the motion of head 2 to place the read-write gap over the appropriate track locations.

Actuator 3 may oscillate the head 2 through a preselected angle Theta, as shown in Fig. 2. Tape motion may be continuous or incremental during read- write operations. Tape 1 may be incremented from track to track during reciprocation of actuator 3, as shown in Fig. 3; the tracks in such case will be equidistant and parallel if the tape is moved in identical increments. Alternatively, tape 1 may be advanced continuously at constant speed during read-write operation while actuator 3 is reciprocated, as shown in Fig. 4. In such event, head 2 will be moved in a series of similarly configured paths relative to the tape.

In each case, the read-write signals are directly (instead of inductively) coupled.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 3 pictures or other non-text objects]