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Debugging User Programs on "Console Less" Controller

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087801D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Solly, DC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Microcode-controlled controllers are commonly used to control data processing subsystems. Generally the controller controls terminals and other devices attached to it in accordance with an application program, normally written by the user to match his particular requirements. Such controllers do not usually have a conventional console as is found in a central processing unit and so on-line debugging of application programs, written in a user language, can be difficult.

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Debugging User Programs on "Console Less" Controller

Microcode-controlled controllers are commonly used to control data processing subsystems. Generally the controller controls terminals and other devices attached to it in accordance with an application program, normally written by the user to match his particular requirements. Such controllers do not usually have a conventional console as is found in a central processing unit and so on- line debugging of application programs, written in a user language, can be difficult.

By using a special purpose test aid program at the user level in combination with additions to the control code, a debug facility can be provided which can be field-installed. Use is made of any display terminal which is attached to the controller and which is supported by the microcode therein.

The drawing shows the relationship between the microcode within the controller and the user programming language code.

User program instructions are executed in the controller by micro code which incorporates an I-phase (the Instruction Fetch Module) and E-phase (the Instruction Execute Module). Each terminal operator on the system is associated with a task, a set of control blocks, and a user program.

The test aid is itself a user program which, by calling an associated microcode transient routine, establishes a linkage between the Fetch Module and a microcode routine, called Event Detect Module, which the transient routine creates in a buffer owned by...