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Spacing Technique for Gas Discharge Display Panel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087816D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, IF: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

In order to prevent bowing or collapsing of large area gas panels at the center due to a pressure differential between the interior and exterior of the panel, various proposals have been made for spacer technology. For example, it has been proposed to embed spacer rods in grooved flow-on dielectric layers and to preform plates in domed shapes. However, all of these approaches have inherent limitations.

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Spacing Technique for Gas Discharge Display Panel

In order to prevent bowing or collapsing of large area gas panels at the center due to a pressure differential between the interior and exterior of the panel, various proposals have been made for spacer technology. For example, it has been proposed to embed spacer rods in grooved flow-on dielectric layers and to preform plates in domed shapes. However, all of these approaches have inherent limitations.

This article provides a simplified means of maintaining gas panel spacing using spacer rods. A technique is disclosed which utilizes glass beads (or rods) placed in cavities formed in E-beam evaporated dielectric glass which follows the contour of grooves previously formed in the glass substrate therefor. The grooves in the substrate may be produced by air abrasion using abrasive particles, chemical etching through suitable masks, or any other reliable technique. As shown in Fig. 1, the subsequently evaporated dielectric glass follows the contour of such grooves, obviating the need for etching the dielectric layers.

It has been observed that the width of a groove obtained by using air abrasion techniques can be controlled with much greater accuracy than the groove depth. Furthermore, an error, delta, in groove width will produce an error of only ~ delta/2 in height, i.e., panel gap. Therefore, good control of the spacing should be possible. While the number of spacers needed depends on the size of the gas panel, it...