Browse Prior Art Database

Selective Detection of Thiols and Disulfides in Liquid Chromatography Eluants

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087833D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Studebaker, JF: AUTHOR

Abstract

High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed into a widely used analytical method in recent years both in research and in industrial applications such as quality control. In HPLC, a solution containing the compound(s) of interest, and usually other compounds as well, is placed at the top of a cylindrical column filled with small particles of a solid material. A liquid "eluant" is then pumped through the column, carrying the compounds through the column at various rates.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Selective Detection of Thiols and Disulfides in Liquid Chromatography Eluants

High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed into a widely used analytical method in recent years both in research and in industrial applications such as quality control. In HPLC, a solution containing the compound(s) of interest, and usually other compounds as well, is placed at the top of a cylindrical column filled with small particles of a solid material. A liquid "eluant" is then pumped through the column, carrying the compounds through the column at various rates.

The rate for an individual compound depends on its affinity for the (stationary) beads material vis-a-vis the eluant, with compounds which have the greatest tendency to stick to the beads moving most slowly. Quantitative determination of a compound is based on the signal generated by a flow-through detector through which the eluant passes after passing through the column. The detector often presents problems in potential applications of HPLC. Unlike gas chromatography, HPLC does not possess a universal detector of high sensitivity, so that it is impossible to detect some compounds at low concentrations. Even where one of the available detectors does have sufficient sensitivity, it may not be sufficiently selective to distinguish the compounds of interest from other compounds.

One possible means of overcoming these problems in certain cases is presented herein. It involves the release of a chromophoric compound from a packed bed of particles when the compounds of interest pass in the liqu...