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Long Life Aluminum Conductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087867D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

D'Heurle, FM: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Aluminum thin film conductors which are widely used in microelectronic applications are susceptible to electromigration failure. As a result of the passage of a direct current either continuous or pulsed, the conductors become discontinuous or fail through other current-related mechanisms.

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Long Life Aluminum Conductors

Aluminum thin film conductors which are widely used in microelectronic applications are susceptible to electromigration failure. As a result of the passage of a direct current either continuous or pulsed, the conductors become discontinuous or fail through other current-related mechanisms.

It has been found that at equal current density the time for failure, at a given test temperature, can be greatly enhanced by the implantation of O(2) ions in the conductor. The ion implantation has to be followed by an annealing treatment which removes some of the disorder introduced in the conductor by the ion implant. Examples of the treatments and the results obtained are given below:

(a) A film approximately 4500 Angstroms thick on an oxidized Si wafer received an implant of 10/18/ ion/cm/2/ at an energy of 190 keV, for an average implant depth of about 2200 Angstroms. This film was annealed at 350 Degrees C for 2 hours. The conductors were tested at 2 x 10 Angstroms/cm/2/ and 175 degrees C. The median failure time is 3300 hours.

(b) A film of the same thickness on an identical substrate received two implants of 1 x 10/17/ ion/cm at 120 keV and 210 keV for two depths of approximately 1300 Angstroms and 2600 Angstroms followed by an anneal at 350 Degrees C for 2 hours. For a test at 2 X 10/6/ Angstroms/cm/2/ and 175 Degrees C, the median time for failure exceeds 6500 hours.

(c) For comparison with (a) and (b), plain aluminum under the same test...