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Milling of CrO(2) Magnetic Particles and Recording Media Made Therefrom

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087981D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kennedy, GM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The use of low density grinding media, e.g., flint pebbles, in a low energy mill e.g., a ball mill, reduces or eliminates the tendency of magnetic inks containing CrO(2) pigment from gelling. These inks have a strong propensity to gel when milled with high density media such as, for example, steel balls. This gelling propensity is even more pronounced in a high energy mill, such as a Drais Mill. The table below shows three examples of CrO(2) ink milled in different manners, in which the milling occurred in an organic solvent and followed by the addition of a resin binder.

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Milling of CrO(2) Magnetic Particles and Recording Media Made Therefrom

The use of low density grinding media, e.g., flint pebbles, in a low energy mill e.g., a ball mill, reduces or eliminates the tendency of magnetic inks containing CrO(2) pigment from gelling. These inks have a strong propensity to gel when milled with high density media such as, for example, steel balls. This gelling propensity is even more pronounced in a high energy mill, such as a Drais Mill. The table below shows three examples of CrO(2) ink milled in different manners, in which the milling occurred in an organic solvent and followed by the addition of a resin binder.

The results show that, by utilizing low density grinding media in a low energy mill, improved characteristics are provided in the product in that there is no propensity for the ink to gel, and the adhesion, abrasion resistance, orientation ratio, and squareness ratio of recording media made therefrom are all improved.

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