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Laser Printing System Using a Class "C" Amplifier to Drive an Acousto-Optic Modulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087984D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McDonald, CM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a laser printing system, the use of a class "C" amplifier to drive an acousto-optic modulator provides optimum print quality and maximum efficiency.

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Laser Printing System Using a Class "C" Amplifier to Drive an Acousto- Optic Modulator

In a laser printing system, the use of a class "C" amplifier to drive an acousto-optic modulator provides optimum print quality and maximum efficiency.

Referring to the figure, acousto-optic modulator 10 comprises a crystal, transducer and matching electronics (not shown). When RF signals or acoustic waves exist in acousto-optic modulator 10, a beam from continuous beam laser 12, passing therethrough, is defracted at the Bragg angle. This beam is the "1st" order beam illustrated in the figure. The amount of power in the "1st" order beam is proportional to the beam power from continuous beam laser 12 and the RF power from class "C" amplifier 14. Thus, if the RF power from class "C" amplifier 14 is zero, the laser beam will pass through acousto-optic modulator 10 with no defractions. This beam is the "0" order beam also illustrated in the figure.

If the laser printing system is adjusted such that the "1st" order beam impinges on photoconductor 16 and the "0" order beam is blocked by shield 18, a series of discharges can be made on photoconductor 16 by controlling the RF power from class "C" amplifier 14, which, in turn, controls acousto-optic modulator 10. These series of discharges on photoconductor 16 establish the desired print pattern thereon. This desired print pattern is ultimately controlled by control logic 20 which determines when pre-amplifier/oscillator 22 drives class...