Browse Prior Art Database

Heat Dissipation From IC Chips Through Module Package

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088035D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balderes, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

With the increasing density of circuit per unit area in integrated-circuit (IC) chips, the problem of dissipation of heat developed in the chip during the operation of the integrated circuit becomes more and more prominent. The present approach offers a method of heat dissipation from the chip through the heat conductive path into the module package.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Heat Dissipation From IC Chips Through Module Package

With the increasing density of circuit per unit area in integrated-circuit (IC) chips, the problem of dissipation of heat developed in the chip during the operation of the integrated circuit becomes more and more prominent. The present approach offers a method of heat dissipation from the chip through the heat conductive path into the module package.

A conventional IC chip supporting a module package is shown and described in U. S. Patent 3,539,876 and particularly in Figs. 18 and 19 therein. In such a conventional module package the IC chip is mounted on a dielectric substrate, preferably a ceramic substrate. In such a conventional package, all of the contact terminals from the chip, which are part of the selective master slice configuration of the chip, are each mounted on a conductive land on the ceramic substrate. These lands provide an electrically conductive path through pins in the module to external circuitry such as a circuit board. In any selected master slice configuration, not all of the available contact terminals extending from the chip are used for such electrically conductive connections. The present structure provides a technique for heat dissipation wherein the chip is provided with an excess number of contact terminals or paths and these excess contact terminals or paths, not used in the electrical configuration of the integrated circuit, are used to dissipate heat from the chip via a conductive path in the ceramic substrate to a heat conductive module housing which serves to dissipate the heat from the chip.

In the struct...