Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Pin Loader

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088037D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cadwallader, RH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In semiconductor package fabrication, terminal pins are frequently solder-bonded to pads on the bottom side of the package. A convenient way of attaching the headed pins on the package is to place the pins in a holder such as an apertured graphite boat, place the package and boat in aligned position, and heat to melt the solder. A particularly troublesome and time-consuming operation is loading the headed pins into the boat.

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Automatic Pin Loader

In semiconductor package fabrication, terminal pins are frequently solder- bonded to pads on the bottom side of the package. A convenient way of attaching the headed pins on the package is to place the pins in a holder such as an apertured graphite boat, place the package and boat in aligned position, and heat to melt the solder. A particularly troublesome and time-consuming operation is loading the headed pins into the boat.

This apparatus is adapted to automatically load pins into an apertured plate or boat in preparation for affixing the pins. In the apparatus a boat 10 is placed on a table 12 in a recessed aperture 14 such that the top surface of the table and boat are in the same plane. The table is mounted on a vibrator 16 adapted to vibrate the table and boat. Beneath the boat is a chamber 18 which is connected through conduit 20 to a suitable source of vacuum.

In operation pins 22 are placed in hopper 24 which can be tilted by a suitable mechanism, typically cylinder 26. The pins emerge from the opening 28 and fall on table 12 which is inclined approximately 5 Degrees. The pins flow over the vibrating boat 10 with the probability that the pins will be shaken into the apertures, as indicated in Fig. 2 by pins 22A. The excess pins, which are not seated in the boat, flow into tube 28 and are returned to the hopper by air jet 30.

During operation the vacuum in chamber 18 is pulsed by a suitable mechanism, typically a rotating valve. The p...