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Airflow Control for Multiport Exhaust System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088104D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fanelli, JM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

There are a variety of environments (such as certain types of manufacturing plants) in which there is a requirement that air be exhausted from each of several discrete stations. A typical exhaust system utilizes a main exhaust duct with branches leading to the various exhaust stations. In some systems, exhaust is continuous at each station, whether or not the individual station is actually being utilized. In other systems, each station may have a damper which controls the exhaust airflow, or which can turn off the flow. Both types of systems are wasteful in terms of energy (and therefore cost) because, in order to be able to handle all exhaust stations, they are continuously exhausting unnecessarily large amounts of heated or cooled factory air.

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Airflow Control for Multiport Exhaust System

There are a variety of environments (such as certain types of manufacturing plants) in which there is a requirement that air be exhausted from each of several discrete stations. A typical exhaust system utilizes a main exhaust duct with branches leading to the various exhaust stations. In some systems, exhaust is continuous at each station, whether or not the individual station is actually being utilized. In other systems, each station may have a damper which controls the exhaust airflow, or which can turn off the flow. Both types of systems are wasteful in terms of energy (and therefore cost) because, in order to be able to handle all exhaust stations, they are continuously exhausting unnecessarily large amounts of heated or cooled factory air.

Control of a multiport exhaust system can be automated to provide a variable total amount of airflow that is (a) sufficient to handle all of the stations that are actually utilizing the exhaust, and (b) no more than is needed for the stations.

The system utilizes an exhaust fan in a main exhaust duct, branch ducts that connect the main duct to the individual exhaust stations, and a sensing and control system, as described below.

At each exhaust station, an on/off switch will indicate to the main system whether or not that station is being used. Each of these switches is associated with a particular resistor in a bank of resistors in a main operational amplifier. The value of th...