Browse Prior Art Database

Serial Number Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088136D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Draper, LA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This device prints a multidigit number on an envelope or similar document as it passes through a transport path. The same number is printed repeatedly along the length of the envelope. After the document has passed through, the number is incremented to the next higher number by momentarily picking a magnet.

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Serial Number Printer

This device prints a multidigit number on an envelope or similar document as it passes through a transport path. The same number is printed repeatedly along the length of the envelope. After the document has passed through, the number is incremented to the next higher number by momentarily picking a magnet.

The motor drives the print roll assembly (including elements through pivot shaft 7 and belts 8 and 9. Belt 9 also drives roll 10, providing a positive drive to both sides of an envelope inserted in the pinch point. Lever 11 is connected to a switch which detects the presence of an envelope in the printing area.

When an envelope is inserted, it is driven by the print roll assembly (1-6) and roll 10, The outer diameter of support wheels 1 is slightly larger than the diameter across the tops of the numbers on print wheels 4. The three flats on the support wheels come just below the tops of the numbers, so as an envelope is driven through the machine, a number will be printed on the envelope only when flats on the support wheels allow the print wheels to contact the envelope.

There are three sets of numbers on each print wheel 4 and three flats on each support wheel 1, so the same number is printed three times in one revolution of the print roll assembly. Spacer 3, that separates the low order and high order digits, has three index marks on it. These marks are kept in alignment with the flats on the support wheels 1 by keying spacer 3 to arbor 6, to which the support wheels 1 are fastened. Print wheels 4 are inked by ink roll 12, and are held in alignment by ball detents 5 which engage on their inner diameter.

To increment, magnet 13 is momentarily energized pulling armature 14 out from between the tips of follower 15 and latch 19. Follower 15 drops down and rests against the tip of interposer 16, and latch 19 moves up and is stopped by follower 15. At this point, longest pawl 17 is still clear of the ratchet teeth on print wheel 4 and the cam contact surface of the follower is clear of the dwell surface of cam 2.

As cam 2, which is fastened to support wheel 1, rotates counterclockwise its high point contacts the follower of interposer 16 which is held just off the dwell surface of the cam by stop 18.

The high point of the cam pulls the tip of the interposer out from under follower 15. The cam-contacting surfaces of follower 15 and interposer 16 are located so that interposer 16 clears the tip of follower 15 just before the active portion of cam 2 comes under the contacting surface of follower 15.

When interposer 16 clears the tip of follower 15, the follower drops down and follows cam 2, carrying latch 19 with it. As the follower drops into the recess in the cam, pawl 17 engages a ratchet tooth on print wheel 4. Arbor 6, support wheels 1, and the remaining print wheels 4 continue to rotate, but the first print wheel stop...