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Coaxial Surge Suppression Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088261D
Original Publication Date: 1977-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Almquist, FA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Problems with voltage surges on small diameter coaxial signal transmission lines are frequently solved by building into the product a surge supression network. Such a network may consist of oppositely poled strings of diodes across the end of the transmission line which provide a high impedance shunt path to normal signal voltages but which act as clamps shunting higher voltages. However, it is not always necessary or desirable to build such networks into the equipment, which in many installations may not be exposed to such surges. The illustrated device can be inserted between the transmission line and the equipment at the time of installation or at any later time when it is found that the environment is or becomes noisy and unwanted surges are present on the line.

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Coaxial Surge Suppression Assembly

Problems with voltage surges on small diameter coaxial signal transmission lines are frequently solved by building into the product a surge supression network. Such a network may consist of oppositely poled strings of diodes across the end of the transmission line which provide a high impedance shunt path to normal signal voltages but which act as clamps shunting higher voltages. However, it is not always necessary or desirable to build such networks into the equipment, which in many installations may not be exposed to such surges. The illustrated device can be inserted between the transmission line and the equipment at the time of installation or at any later time when it is found that the environment is or becomes noisy and unwanted surges are present on the line.

Fig. 1 shows a cutaway view of the coaxial surge suppressor assembly. The opposite ends of assembly 10 mount plug and socket connectors 12, 14 of standard commercial design to fit with mating connectors of a coaxial cable and an equipment connection panel. Assembly 10 includes a through conductor 16 carrying the signal, and has an outer conductor shell 18 insulated from 16 and in communicaton with the sheath portions of connectors 12, 14.

Conductor 16 mounts a pair of printed-circuit cards 20, 22 between which are mounted, in squirrel-cage fashion, a plurality of diodes. These diodes are connected in two groups 24, 26, as indicated in the schematic of Fig. 2, by circ...