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Miniature Kelvin Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088277D
Original Publication Date: 1977-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arnhart, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A Kelvin probe is Provided which includes means for testing to determine that electrical contact is made to a small surface to be measured. Using two Probes, four-point measurements can be made, eliminating contact resistance.

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Miniature Kelvin Probe

A Kelvin probe is Provided which includes means for testing to determine that electrical contact is made to a small surface to be measured. Using two Probes, four-point measurements can be made, eliminating contact resistance.

The Kelvin probe 9 consists of two separate buckling beams 10, 12 made of conductive material and having a half round cross section. An insulator is located between thy two beams. The beams 10, 12 are confined in a channel 16 which holds the beams and yet provides free up and down axial movement so that the beams of the probe can move independently and, thus, contact an uneven surface. The arrangement can be seen best in Figs. 1, 2 and 3.

Fig. 4 is a schematic arrangement showing the separate beams 10, 12 of the Kelvin probe contacting an irregular contact surface 18. This figure also shows the electrical path through the beams and the contacted surface by means of which the probe is tested to determine good electrical contact.

Of course, if the circuit through the beams and surface being contracted is not completed due to misalignments, a programmed stepping routine can be utilized to reposition the probe in a sequenced manner. When two Kelvin probes are in contact with respective surfaces, then the electrical evaluation of the circuit between them can be made. Four-point measurements can be made with one contact of each probe being force and the other being sense, thereby eliminating contact resistance.

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