Browse Prior Art Database

Air Jet Spot Cooling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088281D
Original Publication Date: 1977-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Antonettii, VW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In today's integrated-circuit system, the chips are located in modules mounted on cards. The cooling of these small tightly packed modules is in most cases a critical problem. Conventional cooling systems are designed to cool the worst case module power, which in fact occurs in only a small percentage of the total module population. Because of this and the fact that power dissipation values continue to rise, conventional cooling techniques appear to be inadequate.

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Air Jet Spot Cooling

In today's integrated-circuit system, the chips are located in modules mounted on cards. The cooling of these small tightly packed modules is in most cases a critical problem. Conventional cooling systems are designed to cool the worst case module power, which in fact occurs in only a small percentage of the total module population. Because of this and the fact that power dissipation values continue to rise, conventional cooling techniques appear to be inadequate.

Air jet spot cooling extends the usefulness of conventional air cooling approaches by enhancing the cooling of the few high powered modules in the system.

Figs. 1 and 2 show a typical module 10 on a card 12 configuration with a high powered module fitted with an air shroud 14. The air shroud 14 is clipped on the module 10 so that high pressure, high velocity air is directed over the top surface and, most importantly, over the underside of the module.

In Fig. 3, heat flow is shown by black arrows. In a conventional module the heat flows from the chip 16 to the substrate 18, then through the pins 20 to the card 22 where it is transferred to the air. The heat also flows along the substrate 18 to the can 24 and eventually to the air. Normally, very little air flow reaches the area between the substrate 18 and the card 22. The open arrows in Fig. 3 indicate that the high pressure, high velocity air is forced directly under the substrate 18 producing the added cooling effect needed to coo...