Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Higher Level Programming Languages to Create Program Modifications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088288D
Original Publication Date: 1977-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hemphill, RB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This process (Fig. 1) provides a method of converting the output from an assembler language processor into AMASPZAP [1] control statements. It makes the power and versatility of the higher level programming languages available in the maintenance and test areas of systems programming. It eliminates the time consuming and error-prone process of writing and punching code in machine language. It also makes extended functional changes and complex problem determination routines practical in a maintenance or test environment.

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Use of Higher Level Programming Languages to Create Program Modifications

This process (Fig. 1) provides a method of converting the output from an assembler language processor into AMASPZAP [1] control statements. It makes the power and versatility of the higher level programming languages available in the maintenance and test areas of systems programming. It eliminates the time consuming and error-prone process of writing and punching code in machine language.

It also makes extended functional changes and complex problem determination routines practical in a maintenance or test environment.

The key to the process is a simple Evaluation/Translation program (Fig. 2) which analyzes an assembler listing dataset and produces an output dataset containing the control statements required by AMASPZAP. The Evaluation/Translation routine uses the assembler-generated offset and machine language code to build REP statements, and writes them to the output dataset. All control statements which are not directly associated with the assembled code, such as NAME, VERIFY, DUMP, IDRDATA, and SETSSI, are included in the source language as comments. When the Evaluation/Translation routine recognizes a valid control statement, it merely removes the comment identifiers and writes the statement directly to the output dataset.

The overall process utilizes the Evaluation/Translation routine as an interface between the language processor and AMASPZAP. The process will run in a batch environ...