Browse Prior Art Database

Process for Evaporating Alloy Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088355D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Burkhart, RW: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article describes a method of forming a thin-film alloy of two or more metals which have substantially different vapor pressures, but which can be mutually diffused in the solid state. The method includes the steps of, first, vapor depositing a layer of one of the metals on a substrate followed by vapor depositing the next metal thereon. The layered metals are heated to a sufficient temperature to cause solid state diffusion of the metals to form a substantially uniform alloy. The composition of the alloy can be varied by the selection of the elements and controlling the thicknesses of the layers vapor-deposited.

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Process for Evaporating Alloy Films

This article describes a method of forming a thin-film alloy of two or more metals which have substantially different vapor pressures, but which can be mutually diffused in the solid state. The method includes the steps of, first, vapor depositing a layer of one of the metals on a substrate followed by vapor depositing the next metal thereon. The layered metals are heated to a sufficient temperature to cause solid state diffusion of the metals to form a substantially uniform alloy. The composition of the alloy can be varied by the selection of the elements and controlling the thicknesses of the layers vapor-deposited.

An example of the use of this method is to form constantan (about 55%-60% Cu and 40%-45% Ni.) In this method, first a layer of Ni is vapor-deposited (about 500 Angstrom thick) followed by vapor depositing Cu (about 1500 Angstrom thick) and then vapor depositing a second layer of Ni (about 500 Angstrom.) The composite layers are then heated in vacuum at 500 Degrees C for 2 hours. At the end of this time the metals have diffused to form an essentially uniform alloy which by X-ray diffraction showed a structure of about 55% Cu and 45% Ni.

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