Browse Prior Art Database

Charge Electrode Alignment and Retraction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088375D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mix, AL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Charge electrodes in ink jet devices are used to selectively charge ink jet drops. During startup and shutdown of ink jet streams, the streams are often temporarily unstable, thereby substantially wetting the charge electrodes, shorting them out.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 92% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Charge Electrode Alignment and Retraction

Charge electrodes in ink jet devices are used to selectively charge ink jet drops. During startup and shutdown of ink jet streams, the streams are often temporarily unstable, thereby substantially wetting the charge electrodes, shorting them out.

Traditionally, wetting is avoided by moving the charge electrodes out of the way during startup and shutdown, then, moving them back into aligned position for operation.

The figures illustrate apparatus for engaging and disengaging the charge electrodes into the aligned position.

A swing-up version is shown in Fig. 1. Charge electrodes 11 are affixed to rotatable member 12, which pivots on tapered pin and socket bearings 13 and
14. Thin beam 15 provides spring bias to bearings and zero backlash support, but permits critical lateral adjustment of the charge electrode via turning of pointed fine thread screw 16.

The cardo spring version is shown in Fig. 2. The charge electrodes 17 are affixed to cardo spring holder 18. The two thin beam, parallel portions 19 of the holder, or their equivalent, form a cardo spring and very accurately constrain the motion of the charge electrodes in the lateral direction as they move up and down. The updown may be provided by a cam 20, with flats acting as detents. The "springiness" of the cardo springs biases the holder against the cam. The cam or holder 18 and holder 12 of the previous device may be activated by an electro-mechanical device, such a...