Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Serializer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088399D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callahan, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described for the serialization of optical data pulses in preparation for their transmission via a fiber-optic transmission line or other optical transmission link. The transmission may be between digital computers or between computers and peripheral devices. This method of serializing allows encryption or scrambling of the data to be transmitted.

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Optical Serializer

A technique is described for the serialization of optical data pulses in preparation for their transmission via a fiber-optic transmission line or other optical transmission link. The transmission may be between digital computers or between computers and peripheral devices. This method of serializing allows encryption or scrambling of the data to be transmitted.

Fig. 1 is a side view of the apparatus, Fig. 2 is a top view of the apparatus, and Fig. 3 is a timing diagram showing the timing of the optical data pulses as they reach the near end of the transmission link. The data to be serialized and encrypted is set in a register 10 (Fig. 2), the individual stages of which are connected to driver circuits 11 which drive a group of light sources 12. Light sources 12 may be either light-emitting diodes or lasers. Light sources 12, provided they are to transmit a one value, are simultaneously activated by a fire pulse applied in parallel to each of the driver circuits 11. The light rays from the activated light sources are multiply-reflected between a pair of plane mirrors A and B and focused by an output lens 13 onto the near end of a fiber-optic transmission line 14.

As indicated in Fig. 1, the beam of light from each source initially strikes the mirror A at a different angle of incidence to control the number of reflections and, therefore, the time required for the light impulse to reach the fiber-optic transmission line 14. Fig. 3 shows the timin...