Browse Prior Art Database

Interactive Device Analysis System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088437D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cox, HK: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Previously, process/device problem solutions would be expressed in terms of a numerical integration scheme for some set of mathematical equations, which was then solved by running the program in a batch mode. The Interactive Device Analysis System (IDAS) permits users to communicate with a design program using the designer's terminology because IDAS is a loosely coupled set of interactive programs for the design, analysis, and simulation of semiconductor processes and devices.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Interactive Device Analysis System

Previously, process/device problem solutions would be expressed in terms of a numerical integration scheme for some set of mathematical equations, which was then solved by running the program in a batch mode. The Interactive Device Analysis System (IDAS) permits users to communicate with a design program using the designer's terminology because IDAS is a loosely coupled set of interactive programs for the design, analysis, and simulation of semiconductor processes and devices.

IDAS is designed to run under a time sharing option (TSO) of an operation system (OS), Cambridge Monitor System (CMS), or in any IBM System 360/370 batch system. IDAS is command driven and data base oriented. Since IDAS was developed under TSO, the IDAS command language closely follows the TSO command language.

IDAS permits process/device engineers (users) to view the computer terminal as an automated library for process/device design and analysis, as shown in Fig.
1.

IDAS presently consists of five programs, which can be executed separately but are coupled together by a common data base and a common language (or input format). This loose coupling permits maximum economy and flexibility and also permits users to concentrate on that portion of IDAS that is needed to solve their problem without having to learn all of IDAS.

The five programs are: (1) STRUC, which simulates semiconductor processes and generates two-dimensional semiconductor structures by solving the appropriate one-dimensional nonline...