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Browse Prior Art Database

Noise Reduction in Electronic Detection Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088455D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mitchell, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Electronic detection systems, especially of low level signals, require very high amplification factors. As a result, such systems are especially susceptible to external "noise", such as line noise or radiative noise, e.g., static in an AM radio receiver or spark gap equipment in a laboratory. This external noise can interfere, if not obliterate, the true signal. Shown are two approaches for minimizing such interferences. The solution proposes mixing the noise containing the amplified signal with the inverted signal of the noise, so that the noise is cancelled and the true signal extracted.

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Noise Reduction in Electronic Detection Systems

Electronic detection systems, especially of low level signals, require very high amplification factors. As a result, such systems are especially susceptible to external "noise", such as line noise or radiative noise, e.g., static in an AM radio receiver or spark gap equipment in a laboratory. This external noise can interfere, if not obliterate, the true signal. Shown are two approaches for minimizing such interferences. The solution proposes mixing the noise containing the amplified signal with the inverted signal of the noise, so that the noise is cancelled and the true signal extracted.

This is accomplished by using two analysis systems in parallel, with one tuned to the true signal and the other tuned to the background. Each system involves amplification of the two signals (e.g., true signal with noise and the noise) followed by inversion of the noise and mixing of the signals.

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