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Browse Prior Art Database

Simple Optical Feedback for MICR E13B Encoder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088468D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lancto, DC: AUTHOR

Abstract

In MICR (magnetic ink character recognition) data capture and inscribing machines, hardware reliability requirements often prevent the unobstructed view of documents after they have been read. A low cost 64 position photosensor array 11, originally intended for OCR (optical character recognition) applications, can be used to advantage to provide optical feedback, thereby allowing the operator to override the error indication by keying data not recognized by the MICR reading process. To keep costs low, optical data from each scan of the photosensor array 11 is reduced by logic 13 to 8 bits for display on a 9-bit high gas panel originally designed to display 7 x 9 characters.

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Simple Optical Feedback for MICR E13B Encoder

In MICR (magnetic ink character recognition) data capture and inscribing machines, hardware reliability requirements often prevent the unobstructed view of documents after they have been read. A low cost 64 position photosensor array 11, originally intended for OCR (optical character recognition) applications, can be used to advantage to provide optical feedback, thereby allowing the operator to override the error indication by keying data not recognized by the MICR reading process. To keep costs low, optical data from each scan of the photosensor array 11 is reduced by logic 13 to 8 bits for display on a 9-bit high gas panel originally designed to display 7 x 9 characters.

Data reduction is accomplished by the circuit of Fig. 2. Sixty-four bits of information from the photosensor array 11 are loaded, in parallel, into scan shift register 21 at Clock 0 time. Step Clock pulses shift the contents of register 21 left while simultaneously advancing high counter 23, low counter 25, and clock counter 27. When the first binary one bit is detected in the leftmost position of register 21, bit detect circuit 29 prevents high counter 23 from being incremented further. The count in high counter 23 thereby defines the position of the top of the portion of the first character received from sensor array 11. Single-shot 31 in conjunction with the start of document latch 33 gates one byte of information comprising positions 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 12 of register 21 into the first memory position of display buffer 35. The step clock pulses continue to advance counters 25 and 27 while shifting the content of register 21. Bit detect circuit 29, having detected the first bit, holds high counter 23 from incrementing but allows low counter 25 to increment whenever another binary one bit is detected in the leftmost position of register 21.

At Clock 64 when all 64 bits have been shifted through register 21, the difference between the counts in counters 23 and 25 is detected by compare C1. This difference represents the number of photosensors which detected a portion of a character. If the difference between counters 23 and 25 is greater than one, a portion of the first character has been detected causing first character latch 37 to be set and latch 33 to b...