Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Rotary Joint for Optical Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088542D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lean, EG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The key component for a fiber scanner is the input optical rotary joint which permits the efficient coupling of the incident light to the rotating optical fiber. Coupling schemes have been proposed wherein the fiber is located at the focal point of a lens. As the lens and fiber rotate, any collimated incident beam smaller than the lens will couple to the fiber. Here it is proposed to employ several alternative schemes for coupling the incident light to the fiber.

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Optical Rotary Joint for Optical Scanner

The key component for a fiber scanner is the input optical rotary joint which permits the efficient coupling of the incident light to the rotating optical fiber. Coupling schemes have been proposed wherein the fiber is located at the focal point of a lens. As the lens and fiber rotate, any collimated incident beam smaller than the lens will couple to the fiber. Here it is proposed to employ several alternative schemes for coupling the incident light to the fiber.

Fig. 1 is a schematic representation showing a plan and section view of a six- fiber scanner in which arcuate grooves of radius "a" have a grating of suitable periodicity formed in the bottoms thereof filled with a dielectric material having good optical properties. One end of the groove is terminated with a reflecting surface and the other end extended to accept an optical fiber in aligned relationship. Incident light normal to the grating will be coupled to the waveguide and then to the optical fiber. Rotation of the assembly causes the light exiting from the end of the fiber to scan an extended arcuate path.

If the grating spacing is chosen so that s = Lambda(o) over n, where Lambda(o) is the center wavelength, n is the index of refraction of the groove- gilling material, the incident light will couple to the fiber for the duration of the length of the arcuate grating. The allowable spectral spread of the incident light depends on the numerical aperture (NA) of the fiber. It can be show...