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Technique to Depositing Adhering but Etchable Metallurgy Diamond Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088550D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hutchins, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Diamonds are well-known heat sinks and can be used as heat sinks for GaAs lasers. However, it has been found difficult, at best, to adhere metals to the surface of diamonds. Diamonds are chemically inert and it is difficult to match their coefficients of expansion. Metallization techniques of diamonds have included the use of high pressures and temperatures in combination with very critical diamond-cleaning techniques.

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Technique to Depositing Adhering but Etchable Metallurgy Diamond Surfaces

Diamonds are well-known heat sinks and can be used as heat sinks for GaAs lasers. However, it has been found difficult, at best, to adhere metals to the surface of diamonds. Diamonds are chemically inert and it is difficult to match their coefficients of expansion. Metallization techniques of diamonds have included the use of high pressures and temperatures in combination with very critical diamond-cleaning techniques.

A technique that provides a strongly adherent metal film to a polished diamond surface is described. The metal film is etchable and the technique is obtainable at relatively low temperatures. Only solvent cleaning of the diamond surface is required for the success of this diamond-metallizing technique.

The diamond is placed in an electron-beam evaporative system together with sources of Cr or Ni and Cu. The system is pumped down to about 1 x 10/-7/ mm Hg, and Cr or Ni is evaporated into the surface of the diamond. Evaporation proceeds until a film of about 500 Angstroms is deposited. The deposition temperature is about 250 Degrees C. At the completion of the deposition of Cr or Ni, a film of Cu is then deposited. The Cu film thickness is of the order of 1 micron.

The films as deposited are etchable and the diamond surface is not corroded, which is a problem in some other techniques. The deposited films can withstand the thermal expansion mismatch of diamond on cooling down to...