Browse Prior Art Database

Local Deformation Mesa Approach to Diamond Heat Sink Imbedding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088551D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hutchins, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the past it has been suggested that diamond be imbedded into copper to form a heat sink for GaAs/GaA1As laser arrays. It was believed that the diamond imbedded in the copper could be made coplanar with the copper surface. The insulator could be applied to the copper surface, and drive lines could be fabricated on the copper-insulator and diamond surfaces. These drive lines serve as bonding mounts for laser array on the diamond surface. Prior attempts at preparing heat sinks by imbedding diamonds in copper surfaces were unsuccessful because of the air gaps between the diamond and copper block.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Local Deformation Mesa Approach to Diamond Heat Sink Imbedding

In the past it has been suggested that diamond be imbedded into copper to form a heat sink for GaAs/GaA1As laser arrays. It was believed that the diamond imbedded in the copper could be made coplanar with the copper surface. The insulator could be applied to the copper surface, and drive lines could be fabricated on the copper-insulator and diamond surfaces. These drive lines serve as bonding mounts for laser array on the diamond surface. Prior attempts at preparing heat sinks by imbedding diamonds in copper surfaces were unsuccessful because of the air gaps between the diamond and copper block.

The following method of preparing a diamond copper heat sink eliminates the problems of the prior art. Referring to the figures, the copper substrate has a mesa formed thereon by machining or by chemical etching. A type 2A diamond is imbedded into the copper substrate via the mesas by compressing the diamonds therein. The diamond is imbedded below the surface of the copper, as shown in Fig. 1A. Having imbedded the diamonds, the mesas are flattened by compression. This eliminates the air gaps between the diamond and copper substrate walls (Fig. 1B).

The substrate is made coplanar with the imbedded diamonds by grinding the substrate to about 0.001 inch above the diamond surface, as in Fig. 1C. Finally, the substrate is polished with the substrate flush with the diamond, or an overlapped junction of about 1 to 3...