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Browse Prior Art Database

Matrix Screen Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088557D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ronay, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Every picture or print can be composed of small dots of ink or paint. The idea of the disclosed printing process is to have a screen or a ribbon with pores, representing a two dimensional matrix of short capillaries either open on both ends or only at one end. Such screen is fed into an ink container. At the exit from the ink container, sharp-edged blades (known in engraving as "cleaning doctors") take off the excess ink from both surfaces of the screen, leaving only the openings of the screen filled with ink. The ink stays in the openings of the screen by capillary action. Here, we have a matrix of ink droplets held in a structure by capillary force. Such filled screen is brought into close proximity with the paper.

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Matrix Screen Printer

Every picture or print can be composed of small dots of ink or paint. The idea of the disclosed printing process is to have a screen or a ribbon with pores, representing a two dimensional matrix of short capillaries either open on both ends or only at one end. Such screen is fed into an ink container. At the exit from the ink container, sharp-edged blades (known in engraving as "cleaning doctors") take off the excess ink from both surfaces of the screen, leaving only the openings of the screen filled with ink. The ink stays in the openings of the screen by capillary action. Here, we have a matrix of ink droplets held in a structure by capillary force.

Such filled screen is brought into close proximity with the paper. The transfer of selected drops from the screen to the paper takes place while the rest of the drops remain in the screen. After this, the screen, which preferably is in the form of an endless belt, goes through the ink container again and the process is repeated.

The transfer of the selected ink drops from the screen to the paper may take place in various ways. In each of these ways the screen and paper move together in the horizontal direction during printing.

An array of nozzles 1 (Fig. 1), with the same spacings as the openings on the screen 2, is connected to compressed air. The nozzles are opened and closed by miniature solenoid valves 3. The valve 3 for the selected drop opens and compressed air 6 transfers the drop of ink 5 from the matched hole of the screen 2 onto the paper 4. The nozzles 1 are in close proximity to the screen 2, and the valves 3 are on the back side. The compressed air may be at room temperature or warm depending on ink properties. Instead of air, other gases or pressurized carrier liquids, such as water or organic solvents, may also serve as a transferring medium.

Instead of opening and closing the flow of the carrier stream by a valve, a faster operation may be achieved by deflecting or not deflecting the carrier stream before the screen on demand.

In case of very thick inks, heat caused by a laser beam may cause the transfer of color from the openings of the screen into the paper....