Browse Prior Art Database

Use of In Plane Anisotropy to Facilitate Bubble Automation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088561D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Malozemoff, AP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Bubble automotion will occur when a DC in-plane magnetic field is used in combination with a pulsed in-plane magnetic field at an angle to the DC field. Bubble domains containing unwinding pairs of Bloch lines will move roughly parallel to the DC in-plane field if the pulsed in-plane field has a fast rise time (less than 100 nanoseconds) and slow fall time (greater than 1 microsecond for 5-micron garnet materials).

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Use of In Plane Anisotropy to Facilitate Bubble Automation

Bubble automotion will occur when a DC in-plane magnetic field is used in combination with a pulsed in-plane magnetic field at an angle to the DC field. Bubble domains containing unwinding pairs of Bloch lines will move roughly parallel to the DC in-plane field if the pulsed in-plane field has a fast rise time (less than 100 nanoseconds) and slow fall time (greater than 1 microsecond for 5-micron garnet materials).

A similar effect can be achieved using in-plane anisotropy instead of an applied DC in-plane field. This means that the extra coil usually required for the DC in-plane field will no longer be required. The effect of the in-plane anisotropy is the same as the effect of the previously used DC in-plane field. That is, it provides an equilibrium position for the Bloch lines to which they return after every in-plane field pulse. The Bloch lines prefer to sit at those points of the wall where the wall is intersected by a diameter lying along the easy axis direction.

The in-plane anisotropy can be obtained in garnets by growing the films on a (110) oriented substrate, or by cutting the substrate so that the crystallographic (111) axis is tilted from the surface normal. In amorphous materials, it may be obtained by evaporating the material at an angle or by sputtering a sample beneath the perimeter of a target rather than beneath its center.

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