Browse Prior Art Database

Microcomputer Control of Recording Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088598D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bauer, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

ROM (read-only memory)-driven microcomputers have been used for years in machine control applications. Such configurations include microcomputer interaction with a servo control circuit which, in turn, controls a motive device, such as a motor M. Motor M, in turn, actuates a control device and indicates the degree of actuation to the microcomputer via tachometer T. Additionally, control signals are supplied to the microcomputer from a controlling device (not shown).

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Microcomputer Control of Recording Devices

ROM (read-only memory)-driven microcomputers have been used for years in machine control applications. Such configurations include microcomputer interaction with a servo control circuit which, in turn, controls a motive device, such as a motor M. Motor M, in turn, actuates a control device and indicates the degree of actuation to the microcomputer via tachometer T. Additionally, control signals are supplied to the microcomputer from a controlling device (not shown).

When the control device is a magnetic recorder for use with a data processing system, the microcomputers available generally are too slow for handling all functions performed by the recorder. As a result, some special data flow circuits independent of the microcomputer are provided. For cost reduction, it is preferred that the servo circuits be a unidirectional amplifier driven by an output register of the microcomputer for directly controlling the speed of motor M. In such a situation, the control device is a rotary head portion of a recorder.

The function cycle of a rotating head recorder is determinative of the functions performed by the microcomputer. One of the functions is a servo step and track alignment function. Another function is beginning of read and write, starting step, and so forth.

As shown in the timing diagram, which corresponds to a single rotation of the rotating head, device function A is the record in and read back of data. Microcomputer functions in this regard merely initiate action of the data flow circuits. Accordingly, during device function A, the microcomputer looks for additional control signal...