Browse Prior Art Database

Obtaining an Oxide Free Interface in Via Connections

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088634D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 98K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bauer, HJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Shown in Fig 1 is an evaporator with in situ RF cleaning capability, comprising a work chamber 1 and a evaporation or source chamber 2 with a source 3 divided by a separation valve 4. A diffusion pump 5 maintains the chambers under vacuum during evaporation, whereas an auxiliary diffusion pump (not shown) connected to the work chamber 1 through conduit 6 establishes the vacuum in that chamber during RF cleaning. An inlet 7 is provided in the work chamber for a gas, such as argon. Rotatably mounted in the chamber 1 is an electrically insulated rack 8 for holding workpieces, such as semiconductor wafers. The rack or waferholder 8 is formed with aluminum backing discs 9 for each of the wafers for gettering residual water vapor and oxygen in the chamber.

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Obtaining an Oxide Free Interface in Via Connections

Shown in Fig 1 is an evaporator with in situ RF cleaning capability, comprising a work chamber 1 and a evaporation or source chamber 2 with a source 3 divided by a separation valve 4. A diffusion pump 5 maintains the chambers under vacuum during evaporation, whereas an auxiliary diffusion pump (not shown) connected to the work chamber 1 through conduit 6 establishes the vacuum in that chamber during RF cleaning. An inlet 7 is provided in the work chamber for a gas, such as argon. Rotatably mounted in the chamber 1 is an electrically insulated rack 8 for holding workpieces, such as semiconductor wafers. The rack or waferholder 8 is formed with aluminum backing discs 9 for each of the wafers for gettering residual water vapor and oxygen in the chamber. Each of the aluminum discs carries a layer of copper which serves as a heat sink between the wafers and the discs.

A rotatable RF feed-through 10 transmits the RF potential as well as rotation to the waferholder from a generator (not shown) and a matching network 11 and a motor (not shown), respectively, both of which are mounted outside the chamber.

As shown in Fig. 2, the RF feed-through utilizes a conventional ferrofluidic rotating seal 12 in which an insulative bushing 13 of preferably polytetrafluoroethylene supports a conductive shaft 14 with 0-ring seals 15. Rigid with the shaft is a pulley 16 for rotating the shaft and the waferholder connected to the other...