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Reflective Coating for Light Guides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088639D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kaiser, HD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for improving light transmission through optical waveguides where the guides make abrupt turns.

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Reflective Coating for Light Guides

This article describes a technique for improving light transmission through optical waveguides where the guides make abrupt turns.

In multilayer ceramic modules using optical waveguides, it may be necessary or desirable that the waveguides make abrupt turns from the horizontal to the vertical plane and vice versa. These turns would tend to be areas of large signal loss through escape of the light pulse through the wave walls of the light guide.

In this structure, a layer 10 of material that is highly reflective to light wavelengths is provided at the boundary of the substrate 12 and the material 14 of the waveguide. The reflective coating would then reflect light pulses back into the waveguide, as indicated by the arrows, and reduce losses.

This reflective coating 10 can be formed in a number of ways. One method of forming is to make the substrate with hollow channels. After holes have been punched in the individual multilayer ceramic sheets, they are printed with a metal resinate or carbonyl which will be decomposed after the sheets have been assembled and fired, to form the channels complete with a reflective film. The channels are then filled with waveguide material, e.g., glass, by capillary action. Another technique for forming a reflective coating is to coat the channels formed in the individual green sheets with evaporated, plated, sputtered, etc., metal before filling the waveguide material, and stacking and laminating....