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Liquid Cooled Module With Compliant Membrane

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088679D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Loeffel, EG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

There are several problems encountered in submerging a circuit chip in a low-boiling point liquid to obtain cooling. Rigid cleaning requirements must be met and corrosion problems must be eliminated. Also, there are stresses on discrete wiring caused by the coolant itself and there are interior pressures which set up stresses and safety concerns.

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Liquid Cooled Module With Compliant Membrane

There are several problems encountered in submerging a circuit chip in a low-boiling point liquid to obtain cooling. Rigid cleaning requirements must be met and corrosion problems must be eliminated. Also, there are stresses on discrete wiring caused by the coolant itself and there are interior pressures which set up stresses and safety concerns.

The above-noted problems in the cooling of circuit chips can be overcome by preventing liquid contact with the chips. This can be accomplished by molding a plurality of heat sinks 10 into a flexible membrane 12 so that each heat sink can be placed in contact with a chip 14 to be cooled. The flexible membrane 12 could have large copper pads plated therethrough and the cooling fins 10 could be attached by percussion-welding copper wires to these copper pads. The membrane 12 containing the heat sink 10 is sealed across the cap 16 opening so that the cap 16 can contain distilled water or equivalent coolant 18, as shown in Fig. 1.

The coolant 18 transfers heat from the heat sinks 10 to the finned-type cap 16 by natural convection. The heat can be rejected from the cap 16 by means of a cold plate 20 or any equivalent heat sink. The cap assembly is attached to a substrate 22 on which the chips 14 to be cooled are mounted and the chip area is filled with a conductive gas 24. The coolant chamber is subsequently pressurized to 1-2 lbs. per square inch to force the individual heat sinks...