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Dielectric Fluidized Cooling System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088682D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chu, RC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method of cooling electronic components is set forth utilizing particle-packed columns with circulating liquid flowing therethrough. The particle size, its packing density in conjunction with liquid flow rate, determines the heat transfer characteristics of the system. The particles cause the same effect on the boundary layer as do the boiling bubbles in a nucleate boiling arrangement. The necessity to keep the system dielectric is merely a consideration of being compatible with the electronic components.

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Dielectric Fluidized Cooling System

A method of cooling electronic components is set forth utilizing particle- packed columns with circulating liquid flowing therethrough. The particle size, its packing density in conjunction with liquid flow rate, determines the heat transfer characteristics of the system. The particles cause the same effect on the boundary layer as do the boiling bubbles in a nucleate boiling arrangement. The necessity to keep the system dielectric is merely a consideration of being compatible with the electronic components.

Referring to the figure, the solid particles 10 are shown tightly packed in a section of a coolant flow line which contains the components 14 to be cooled. The solid particles 10 are held in place or confined between mechanical filters 12, one at the inlet and one at the outlet of the coolant flow, It is preferable that the particles 10 have a shape which conform somewhat to the shape of the components 14 to be cooled. These particles may be spherical in shape and confined so as to be relatively stationary with respect to the components. Therefore, the circulating liquid, before and after the columns, will be free of particles. The particles 10 can be replaced by flexible porous material, such as plastic foams or the equivalent. Of course, if dielectric properties are not required, it is possible to use other materials, such as metal, H(2)O, etc.

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