Browse Prior Art Database

Nontactile Keyboard Auxiliaries

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000088697D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fox, JE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The figure shows a mechanism for inexpensively providing nontactile response keyboard assemblies with tactile response feel, keyboard lock and dual force automatic reactivation functions. Inexpensive push-type switches which do not have a sudden snap action are described as non-tactile response devices.

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Nontactile Keyboard Auxiliaries

The figure shows a mechanism for inexpensively providing nontactile response keyboard assemblies with tactile response feel, keyboard lock and dual force automatic reactivation functions. Inexpensive push-type switches which do not have a sudden snap action are described as non-tactile response devices.

Inexpensive keyboard assemblies 1 having numerous such key button and switches 2 are commonly available today. It is desirable to provide such a keyboard with a tactile feedback to tell the operator that actual key actuation has occurred when a key button 2 is depressed. This is provided in the present instance by supporting the entire keyboard 1 between side rails 3 and two parallel bails 4 so that the entire keyboard assembly 1 can be translated downward in response to the operator's finger pressure. Bails 4 are connected to a drive arm 5 so that keyboard 1 may move up and down parallel to a base 6 in which bails 4 are pivotally mounted. Return spring 7 biases the drive arm 5 and bails 4 in their upward positions so that keyboard 1 is ordinarily in the raised position. The force to keep the keyboard in the raised position is approximately 700 to 1,200 grams in a typical example. A solenoid 8 is mounted at one end of base 6 with its armature 9 engaged in a slot in an end of drive arm 5. The air gap limit of solenoid 8 at its armature 9 and poll pieces 10 limits the total amount of upward motion of the keyboard assembly under the action of return spring 7. A tab 11 on the end of drive arm 5 is positioned to interrupt the beam of light in a photo source and detector module 12, also mounted on base 6.

When keyboard 1 is forced downward by finger pressure from an operator on one of the keybuttons 2, the tab 11 will enter or leave...